NEW RESOURCE: Colour Your Day with Madame Simonet!

We’re delighted to announce the release of a colouring sheet for young dancers, based on a portrait of the elegant Adelaide Simonet. Perfect for handing out in class or sharing with your child at home, this colouring sheet will stimulate children’s curiosity and widen their horizons as they learn about Adelaide Simonet and the world in which she lived.

This downloadable PDF is accompanied by Teaching Notes that include a short biography of Adelaide Simonet based on original research as well as live links to additional resources and suggestions for further reading. For teachers, there are also ideas for incorporating the sheet into class lessons, and this flexible activity sheet can be used to complement all dance syllabuses including RAD and Cecchetti.

AU$4.95 Buy Now!

So who was Adelaide Simonet? 

Adelaide Simonet (pronounced SEE-MO-NAY or SEE-MO-NET – either is acceptable) was one of Britain’s most popular ballet dancers in the late eighteenth century. Although the year and place of her birth are uncertain, it is assumed she trained in France before moving to London in the 1770s. There, she performed for many years with her husband, Louis Simonet, at the city’s opera house: the prestigious King’s Theatre. The couple also taught dance to the London gentry and aristocracy, and to other dancers including their three daughters.

In 1782 the celebrated choreographer Jean-Georges Noverre visited London to stage his innovative ballet d’action, Medee et Jason. Adelaide was invited to play the leading role of the vengeful sorceress, Medea, and was revealed to be dancer of rare dramatic gifts. She even earned comparison with Britain’s leading actress of the day, Sarah Siddons.

The portrait on which the colouring sheet is based was issued in the popular periodical Bell’s British Theatre in 1781. It was one of only four portraits of dancers ever to be issued by the journal, and shows Simonet costumed as the Princess in the ballet Ninette à la Cour. All four of these portraits (which included Auguste Vestris, his father Gaetan, and Giovanna Baccelli) were prompted by the wave of interest in ballet brought about by Vestrimania.

You’ll discover some very surprising facts about Adelaide Simonet in the Teaching Notes accompanying the colouring sheet. Click here to purchase this delightful resource and open a child’s eyes to the magic of ballet’s past!

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